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Don’t Let Fall Eye Allergies Get You Down

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Red, itchy, watery eyes and swollen eyelids (along with sneezing, congestion or a runny nose)... these symptoms are a clear indication that allergy season has arrived. These allergic symptoms are caused by a reaction to allergens, which are substances in the environment that are usually harmless. If, however, you are one of the unlucky that is predisposed to allergies, these substances can illicit a serious and sometimes even debilitating allergic response. 

As opposed to food, medicine, or insect allergies which don’t often affect the eyes, eye allergies are a common symptom of airborne allergens including mold, pollen (from trees and flowers), dust and pet dander. The summer fall and spring are often the worst times for a high pollen count and many individuals suffer during these seasons. 

An allergic eye reaction occurs when your eye releases histamines in an effort to protect itself from a perceived threat (an allergen such as dust, pollen, animal dander, mold spores, eye drops or airborne chemicals). The release of the histamines causes the symptoms of redness, itchiness, burning and tearing. This response is also sometimes known as allergic conjunctivitis. 

The most common type of eye allergies are perennial and seasonal allergic conjunctivitis. Perennial eye allergies are a response to household allergens that exist all year round such as pet dander, mold, or dust mites. Seasonal allergies usually result from pollen from plants, grass and trees that are found in the air and depend on the season and the types of pollens in the environment.  Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is often more severe than perennial and can cause puffy eyelids and itching which can make symptoms worse. 

The best way to reduce discomfort and prevent an allergic reaction is to stay away from allergens as much as possible. Here are some tips on how to reduce exposure:

  • Minimize outdoor exposure during pollen season: 
  • Stay inside when pollen counts are particularly high or during a windy day.
  • Keep windows closed and use air conditioner with a clean filter.
  • Wear sunglasses outside to keep irritants from entering the eyes. 
  • Reduce indoor allergens:
  • Wash bedding frequently in hot water and use mite-proof covers on pillows, blankets and mattresses. 
  • Prevent household mold by reducing humidity and keeping areas that are subject to humidity or dampness (such as bathrooms, kitchens or basements) clean. Use a dehumidifier when necessary and clean any mold you see with bleach. 
  • To reduce dust, clean floors and surfaces with a damp rag or mop rather than sweeping or dry dusting. 
  • Wash your hands and clothes after coming into contact with animals.
  • DO NOT rub your eyes as this can worsen symptoms, greatly aggravating swelling and itchiness, and can sometimes even cause an infection. 

If you have severe allergies, avoid contact lens wear or reduce wear time when allergies flare up, as contact lenses can worsen symptoms and do not fit as they normally would when the eyes are swollen. This is why having back up glasses is so important. Changing to one day single use disposable contacts can also sometimes reduce allergy symptoms.   

There are some steps you can take to alleviate symptoms of eye allergies. Over-the-counter solutions include artificial tears, decongestant eye drops (which shouldn’t be used for longer than a week) or oral antihistamines (which can sometimes worsen symptoms). If no eye drops are available, cool compresses (avoid heat) will also help to reduce the itch.  If these treatments don’t work, you can get a prescription for stronger eye drops (antihistamine or short term steroid drops to reduce symptoms), oral antihistamines or possibly immunotherapy (such as allergy shots).

If you are experiencing symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis, don’t just assume they are allergies. See your eye doctor to determine the cause to ensure that it is not a more serious eye condition. 

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CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) UPDATE – MARCH 23, 2020

PLEASE CALL 603-524–5770 BEFORE COMING TO OUR OFFICE.

We are all very concerned with the responsibilities that the coronavirus has placed upon us in recent weeks. We strive our best to maintain the health and well-being of both our patients and our staff. We are all familiar with the CDC guidelines of social distancing, hand washing, hand sanitizers and staying home as much as possible. We are busy at our office disinfecting surfaces between patient visits and completely at the end of each day.

In order to maintain best practice guidelines, beginning March 23, 2020 our office will remain open, with reduced hours from 9:00AM to 1:00PM Monday through Friday. Daily appointments will be reserved for emergencies,urgent care and essential services only, to relieve the burden on the ER and urgent care clinics. Routine eye care services will be rescheduled to future dates. We will be open for delivery of eyeglasses, contact lenses, vitamin supplements,etc.

If you have an eye emergency and need an appointment, please call ahead with your insurance information available so we may verify it before you arrive. If you are picking up glasses, contact lenses, etc. please call ahead to schedule a time for delivery.

If you are sick, have flu-like symptoms or have been exposed to anyone havingCOVID-19, please call ahead to let us know your circumstances so we may help determine the best course of action.

Winnipesaukee Eye is here to serve the community in this time of need. Medical eye care emergencies don’t take a vacation just because we are experiencing this pandemic. Smart precautionary practices and cooperation will allow us to provide a much needed service while supporting a safe and healthy visit.

PLEASE CALL 603-524-5770 TO LET US KNOW YOU ARE COMING PRIORTO YOUR VISIT.

Thank you.

Doctors McManus and the Zagroba, and the Winnipesaukee Eye Staff.